The Insurgent Legacy of Evelyn Nakano Glenn

The Insurgent Legacy of Evelyn Nakano Glenn

11/03/2016 – 10:00am to 5:00pm
Multicultural Community Center, MLK Student Union Building, UC Berkeley

 

Save the Date:
The Insurgent Legacy of Evelyn Nakano Glenn
Thursday, November 3, 2016
12pm – 5:30pm
Multicultural Community Center, MLK, Jr. Student Union
UC Berkeley
(Location is wheelchair accessible.)
After 43 years of transformative scholarship, Center for Race & Gender Founding Director, Prof. Evelyn Nakano Glenn, retired from her faculty position last spring. Prof. Nakano Glenn’s fearless writing, multifaceted approach to social justice research, and commitment to mentoring scholarly leaders across disciplines continue to impact scholars and activists around the globe.  This symposium will provide an opportunity to honor Prof. Nakano Glenn’s insurgent legacy and her influential impact on race and gender scholarship. Don’t miss it!
PANELS:
Education Justice & Insurgent Citizenships
Adventures in Intersectionality
Radicalizing Care & Labor Justice
SPEAKERS:
Paola Bacchetta, UC Berkeley
Elsa Barkley Brown, University of Maryland
Linda Burnham, National Domestic Workers Alliance
Grace Chang, UC Santa Barbara
Kevin Escudero, Brown University
Marco Flores, UC Berkeley
Annie Fukushima, University of Utah
Priya Kandaswamy, Mills College
Elaine Kim, UC Berkeley
Nelson Maldonado-Torres, Rutgers University
Cecilia Menjivar, University of Kansas
Margaret Rhee, University of Oregon
Juana María Rodríguez, UC Berkeley
Ula Taylor, UC Berkeley
Charis Thompson, UC Berkeley
Cheryl Townsend Gilkes, Colby College
(Art by Micah Bazant)

Special Issue: Mobilizing Vulnerability: new Directions in Transnational Feminist Studies and Human Rights

I am thrilled to announce the article I published with Feminist Formations, “An American Haunting: Unsettling Witnessing in Transnational Migration, the Ghost Case and Human Trafficking” is available to read. The special issue, “Mobilizing Vulnerability: New Directions in Transnational Feminist Studies and Human Rights” was co-edited by Wendy S. Hesford and Rachel A. Lewis. It features the works of Katie E. Oliviero, Heather Switzer, Emily Bent, Crystal Leigh Endsley, Leifa Mayers, Jane Juffer, Amy Shuman, Carol Bohmer, Alexandra Schultheis Moore, Sylvanna M. Falcon, and Rachel A. Lewis.

Volume 28, Issue 1, Spring 2016

Table of Contents

Special Issue: Mobilizing Vulnerability: New Directions in Transnational Feminist Studies and Human Rights

Introduction

Mobilizing Vulnerability: New Directions in Transnational Feminist Studies and Human Rights

pp. vii-xviii

Articles

Vulnerability’s Ambivalent Political Life: Trayvon Martin and the Racialized and Gendered Politics of Protection

pp. 1-32

Precarious Politics and Girl Effects: Exploring the Limits of the Girl Gone Global

pp. 33-59

The “Orphan” Child: Politics of Vulnerability and Circuits of Precarity

pp. 60-85


Feature

Arte de Lágrimas

pp. 86-93


Can the Children Speak?: Precarious Subjects at the US-Mexico Border

pp. 94-120

The Uncomfortable Meeting Grounds of Different Vulnerabilities: Disability and the Political Asylum Process

pp. 121-145

An American Haunting: Unsettling Witnessing in Transnational Migration, the Ghost Case, and Human Trafficking

pp. 146-165

“Dispossession within the Law”: Human Rights and the Ec-Static Subject in M. NourbeSe Philip’s Zong!

pp. 166-189

The Particularism of Human Rights for Latin American Women of African Descent

pp. 190-204

Queering Vulnerability: Visualizing Black Lesbian Desire in Post-Apartheid South Africa

pp. 205-232