University of Utah GBVC covered in the Salt Lake Tribune

Thank you to Becky Jacobs and the Salt Lake Tribune for covering the University of Utah’s Gender-Based Violence Consortium. So appreciative of the coverage to raise visibility about the consortium. Not only is it informational, but Jacobs shares resources for survivors who may be reading content and experiencing violence. Raising awareness as one is raising consciousness.

Visit the link to read the full article.

University of Utah researchers team up to study gender-based violence in state

by Becky Jacobs

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/07/19/university-utah/

The Sociology of Human Rights and COVID-19.

Footnotes: A publication of American Sociological Association’s May/June 2020 special issue is a Special Issue: Sociologists and Sociology during COVID-19. My co-authored article, “The Sociology of Human Rights and COVID-19,” is included; this submission is co-authored with Joachim J. Savelsberg, an amazing human rights sociologist at University of Minnesota.

Four axioms show the effect of the COVID-19 situation on human rights and the relevance of the sociology of human rights in the current era. Each axiom is followed by U.S. (Fukushima) and global (Savelsberg) illustrations.

 

Multiplicity of stigma: cultural barriers in anti-trafficking response

https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/IJHRH-07-2019-0056/full/html

Annie Isabel Fukushima, Kwynn Gonzalez-Pons, Lindsay Gezinski, Lauren Clark

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the social understanding of stigma as a societal and cultural barrier in the life of a survivor of human trafficking. The findings illustrate several ways where stigma is internal, interpersonal and societal and impacts survivors’ lives, including the care they receive.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used qualitative methods. Data collection occurred during 2018 with efforts such as an online survey (n = 45), focus groups (two focus groups of seven participants each) and phone interviews (n = 6). This study used thematic analysis of qualitative data.

Findings

The research team found that a multiplicity of stigma occurred for the survivors of human trafficking, where stigma occurred across three levels from micro to meso to macro contexts. Using interpretive analysis, the researchers conceptualized how stigma is not singular; rather, it comprises the following: bias in access to care; barriers of shaming, shunning and othering; misidentification and mislabeling; multiple levels of furthering how survivors are deeply misunderstood and a culture of mistrust.

Research limitations/implications

While this study was conducted in a single US city, it provides an opportunity to create dialogue and appeal for more research that will contend with a lens of seeing a multiplicity of stigma regardless of the political climate of the context. It was a challenge to recruit survivors to participate in the study. However, survivor voices are present in this study and the impetus of the study’s focus was informed by survivors themselves. Finally, this study is informed by the perspectives of researchers who are not survivors; moreover, collaborating with survivor researchers at the local level was impossible because there were no known survivor researchers available to the team.

Practical implications

There are clinical responses to the narratives of stigma that impact survivors’ lives, but anti-trafficking response must move beyond individualized expectations to include macro responses that diminish multiple stigmas. The multiplicity in stigmas has meant that, in practice, survivors are invisible at all levels of response from micro, meso to macro contexts. Therefore, this study offers recommendations for how anti-trafficking responders may move beyond a culture of stigma towards a response that addresses how stigma occurs in micro, meso and macro contexts.

Social implications

The social implications of examining stigma as a multiplicity is central to addressing how stigma continues to be an unresolved issue in anti-trafficking response. Advancing the dynamic needs of survivors both in policy and practice necessitates responding to the multiple and overlapping forms of stigma they face in enduring and exiting exploitative conditions, accessing services and integrating back into the community.

Originality/value

This study offers original analysis of how stigma manifested for the survivors of human trafficking. Building on this dynamic genealogy of scholarship on stigma, this study offers a theory to conceptualize how survivors of human trafficking experience stigma: a multiplicity of stigma. A multiplicity of stigma extends existing research on stigma and human trafficking as occurring across three levels from micro, meso to macro contexts and creating a system of oppression. Stigma cannot be reduced to a singular form; therefore, this study argues that survivors cannot be understood as experiencing a singular form of stigma.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The researchers would like to acknowledge the funds received from the Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office, Dr Jennifer Seelig, the Salt Lake City Council and the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office, which supported a city-wide needs assessment. The findings and recommendations presented in this article are those of the authors and do not represent the official positions or policies of the Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office, the Salt Lake City Council or the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Offices. The authors would also like to thank the Social Research Institute of the College of Social Work at University of Utah and graduate assistance from Allison O’Connor, MSW, LCSW and Lyndsi Drysdale. Additionally, the authors are grateful to the guest editor Dr Sarbinaz Bekmuratova, the anonymous reviewers and the editorial team at the International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare.

Citation

Fukushima, A.I.Gonzalez-Pons, K.Gezinski, L. and Clark, L. (2020), “Multiplicity of stigma: cultural barriers in anti-trafficking response”, International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJHRH-07-2019-

Mobility & Temporality – May the 4th with Migratory Times

May 4th, 10AM PDT / 1PM EDT / 7PM CEST

Register
bit.ly/migratorytimessalon

You are invited to a Salon on Mobility & Temporality with Migratory Times. Migratory Times is a project of the Institute of (im)Possible Subjects and Center for Arts, Design and Social Research. IiS is a transnational feminist collective producing art and education events and a collectively edited online open access journal of art and writing. Center for Arts, Design and Social Research, Inc., US based non-profit 501(c)3 organization supporting independent arts, design, and research focused on positive social impact, globally.

With Crystal Baik (University of California, Riverside), Anyely Marin and Rebecca Close (Critical Dias, Spain), José Manuel Cortez (University of Oregon), Romeo García (University of Utah), Latipa (University of California, Riverside), Jackline Kemigisa (Uganda), Isabelle Massu (Institut des Beaux Arts de Besançon, France), Alejandro Perez (Berkeley City College), Jennifer Reimer (FWF Lise Meitner), Daphne Taylor-Garcia (University of California, San Diego).

Facilitators: Annie Isabel Fukushima & Dalida Maria Benfield (Migratory Times)

“Witnessing in a Time of Homeland Futurities”

Download article: https://www.academia.edu/42871374/Witnessing_in_a_Time_of_Homeland_Futurities

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87nxqrCGJVI&feature=youtu.be

Annie Isabel Fukushima from the University of Utah speaks about her article “Witnessing in a Time of Homeland Futurities”, due to be published on 27 April. “Current US rhetorical strategies of imagining a future of the homeland have led to the creation and utilisation of new technologies to contain and manage the border. These responses to the US border and immigration impact anti-trafficking efforts, sustaining a ‘homeland futurity’. Homeland futurity draws on and extends discourses of emergency that solidify borders as dangerous and risky. This article traces how homeland futurities emerged in US anti-trafficking efforts. Drawing upon interviews and focus group discussions with service providers and survivors of violence in San Francisco, the article demonstrates how migrant labourers are impacted by a discourse of threat and containment of the border. However, migrant labourers and their allies are innovating to secure a life that mitigates risk through migrant labourers’ use of technology. This article illustrates through the example of Contratados.org how technology may facilitate opportunities of future visioning by migrant labourers beyond a homeland futurity, to enact practices that bring to the centre migrants and their experiences through social networking and information sharing on job prospects.”

Publication of Issue 14 of Anti-Trafficking Review, ‘Technology, Anti-Trafficking, and Speculative Futures’

Guest Editors: Jennifer Musto and Mitali Thakor Editor: Borislav Gerasimov 

Over the past decade, scholars, activists, and policymakers have repeatedly called for an examination of the role of technology as a contributing force to human trafficking and exploitation. Attention has focused on a range of issues – from adult services websites and the use of social media to recruit victims to the utilisation of data analytics software to understand trafficking and identify ‘hotspots of risk’. At the same time, technology has also been positioned as a disruptor of human trafficking that can be reworked and transformed ‘from a liability into an asset’. Yet, critical anti-trafficking scholars have cautioned that claims about the relationship between technology and trafficking rely on limited data and a number of assumptions.
The new issue of Anti-Trafficking Review explores these assumptions and the currently available technological tools that purport to address trafficking and exploitation. An article by Sanja Milivojevic, Heather Moore, and Marie Segrave traces the discourse surrounding technology and (anti-)trafficking since the early 2000s and outlines four common myths on which it is built. The authors call for more evidence but also more attention to issues such as fair labour migration regimes and decent work. Three articles – by Stephanie Limoncelli; Laurie Berg, Bassina Farbenblum, and Angela Kintominas; and Annie Isabel Fukushima – analyse various apps developed with the goal of combating exploitation. They show that many of these apps have limited, if any, benefit for trafficked persons or at-risk groups, while largely reinforcing neoliberal economic ideologies about the limited role of governments in regulating businesses. Such apps can only be useful when they are developed by, for, and with the people meant to use them, as Fukushima’s article demonstrates. Another three articles focus on the practice of shutting down websites hosting sex work ads as a way to reduce trafficking in the sex industry. Samantha Majic compares the public reactions to the shutting down of MyRedbook and Rentboy – sites used by, respectively, female and gay male sex workers. She urges the LGBT movement to overcome its ‘respectability politics’ and show greater solidarity with the sex worker rights movement. Erin Tichenor’s article documents the impact of the shutting down of Backpage on sex workers in New Zealand, while Danielle Blunt and Ariel Wolf examine the impact of the same in the United States. Both articles demonstrate how closing sex work ads sites has negative economic and emotional consequences for sex workers. Writing from the perspective of an NGO providing direct assistance to trafficked persons, Isabella Chen and Celeste Tortosa reflect on the use of digital evidence in human trafficking investigations and prosecutions. In the final article, Kate Mogulescu and Leigh Goodmark show what happens to survivors of human trafficking who are prosecuted as traffickers and placed on sex offender registries in the United States. 
Taken together, the articles in this Special Issue converge around one central point: the factors that enable and sustain human trafficking and exploitation are complex and require political will – not tech solutionist fixes. Anti-traffickers’ obsession with technological ‘solutions’ draws attention and resources away from issues such as decent work, gender, economic and racial justice, the free movement of people, and quality public services. In the current COVID-19 pandemic it is more urgent than ever to re-focus on these larger socio-economic and political issues.

https://www.antitraffickingreview.org/index.php/atrjournal

For all contributions:

A Survey of Child Welfare and Labor Trafficking in California: A White Paper

Download the full White Paper:

The purpose of this study is to better understand how the welfare system is currently identifying children (under 18-years-old) who experience being labor trafficked for commercial labor – work beyond sexual economies. This study is a survey of individuals working in California, where 186 participants were invited to respond to a questionnaire between September 23, 2019 and November 30, 2019. The majority of those who responded to the survey worked in the child welfare system. This study reveals, child welfare workers, probation officers / juvenile justice system workers, and non-governmental organizations are working with children who have been labor trafficked. What was discovered after conducting a survey: 25% of the participants confirmed working with children who were labor trafficked, 25% did not know if they had worked with children who were labor trafficked, and 50% were providing services to or supporting children who work for pay. Children were informally identified as working in a range of industries including agriculture / farm work, construction, forced commercial sexual economies, forced drug sales, forced human smuggling, forced theft/stealing, housekeeping/domestic work, janitorial, massage parlor/massage, nail/hair salon, pan handling/begging, restaurant work, retail, and other. Based on these preliminary findings, this study recommends the following next steps:

  1. There is an immediate need to develop protocols and train child welfare workers on child labor trafficking, similarly to how such professionals are being trained on child sex trafficking.      
  2. There is a need to deepen an understanding of child welfare and juvenile justice system’s responses to child labor and sex trafficking through research; in particular on evidence-based research that may determine promising practices for prevention and early identification of all forms of human trafficking affecting children.
  3. It is recommended that California State Agencies and local organizations broaden their awareness raising efforts to encompass education on children’s experience with work and the continuum of labor violations and trafficking.
  4. Prevention of child labor trafficking is much needed, therefore, more data on children who experience labor exploitation on the continuum of labor violation and trafficking is needed. Statewide data collection systems have been designed to capture prevalence of child sexual exploitation, however, less understood is the range of labor violations, recruitment and industries children may be experiencing commercial exploitation. 

Xicanx/Latinx Heritage Month Keynote Speaker.

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General

Announcement!

Xicanx/Latinx Heritage Month Keynote Speaker.

 

You are invited to a plática/ talk featuring Annie Isabel Fukushima, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah and author of the upcoming:  Migrant Crossings: Human Trafficking in the United States

11:00 AM, Wednesday, September 26th in Berkeley City College Rm. 216

Dr. Annie Isabel Fukushima is Assistant Professor in the Division of Ethnic Studies at the University of Utah. In addition, she has served as an expert witness for human trafficking cases in California and Colorado, and a consultant, recently producing the Grant Management Toolkit for Office for Trafficking in Persons. Her most recent projects have been funded by the San Francisco Department on the Status of Women (2018) and the Abundance Foundation (2016 – 2017).

Dr. Fukushima has published extensively on human trafficking, intimacy and race, and immigration. Her upcoming interdisciplinary work examines Asian and Latinas trafficked into the United States. She reminds us, “In spite of the violence as systemic and naturalized, survivors are always resisting.”

Sponsored by Ethnic Studies and Mexican/Latin American Studies at Berkeley City College

This message was sent from the Berkeley City College Public Information Office.  For further information call 510-981-2852.

Felicia Bridges, Ed.D

Public Information Officer

Berkeley City College

(510) 981-2852

www.berkeleycitycollege.edu

Violence Against Women Needs Assessment Community Presentation

CP_VAWNeedsAssessment

You are invited to attend a community presentation hosted by the University of Utah and the Department on the Status of Women, “Violence Against Women Needs Assessment.” The presentation will include University of Utah’s findings from the San Francisco Violence Against Women Needs Assessment. The findings will be presented by Dr. Annie Isabel Fukushima, the project’s Principal Investigator. This event is co-hosted with the San Francisco Department on the Status of Women.

Event Details:

Date & Time: Friday, June 22, 2018, 3-5:30pm. 
Event Location: 25 Van Ness Avenue, Suite 610, San Francisco, CA.

The Violence Against Women Needs Assessment is a study conducted by the University of Utah. The study was made possible through a grant funded by the San Francisco Department on the Status of Women (2018).

Catering will be provided by Eat Suite.

Please RSVP by June 8th for planning purposes. However, anyone and everyone in the community is welcome to attend regardless of your RSVP.

Should you have questions about the event, food allergies, dietary restrictions, need accommodations, need translation, or would prefer to RSVP by email, please contact Elizabeth Boley at ecboley[at]gmail[dot]com or visit http://evite.me/rh9PPbyQew

Grant Management Toolkit: Building Sustainable Anti-Trafficking Programs.

I am pleased to share with you a resource / tool-kit published with the Office for Trafficking in Persons. This project was made possible with the collaboration between myself (Annie Fukushima) and Kathleen Morris (International Rescue Committee) – Grant Management Toolkit: Building Sustainable Anti-Trafficking Programs. While we were the primary authors, the project was also supported by the amazing team at the National Human Trafficking Training and Technical Assistance Center managed by ICF.  
 
This toolkit is intended to assist OTIP grantees as well as other organizations in creating a culture and infrastructure that support the effective implementation and sustainability of anti-trafficking programs.  It provides information on organizational identity (mission, vision, value statements, organizational structure, approach, communication), strategic planning, culture and approaches, grant management and administration, partnership development and management, measuring performance, and sustainable planing.  It includes links to official resources on federal websites, as well as supplemental, unofficial information from other sources.
 
Visit the website to download the full PDF of the toolkit.