Mentees presenting at Undergraduate Research Symposium at University of Utah

Check out some of my mentees presenting their projects at the Undergraduate Research Symposium. #proudprofessor.

ALEXANDER HIRAI – LOSS ASSOCIATED WITH JAPANESE AMERICAN INCARCERATION

JENNY HOBBS – WOKBE: IMPLICIT BIAS WEB APP PILOT

JOCELYNE LOPEZ – HABLEMOS SALUD

https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/798772987%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-tGUAPjJ7Gt7

VERONICA LUKASINSKI – THE IMPACT OF THE NON-FATAL STRANGULATION PROTOCOL IN SALT LAKE COUNTY ON PROTECTIVE ORDERS

ALEX SON – STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES

Honoring Human Trafficking Awareness Day – Teaching about Human Trafficking Fall 2019

To honor human trafficking awareness day, I would like to share content created by students at the University of Utah.

SW 6621 / SW 5830 at University of Utah
Semester: Fall 2019

University of Utah
An Online Course
Professor Annie Isabel Fukushima

This course was an upper division undergraduate and graduate online human trafficking elective course designed to introduce students to contemporary human trafficking, both domestically and globally. Students learned about important terminology and types of trafficking, indicators of and contributors to this issue, and policy debates regarding appropriate intervention. They grappled with theories and debates on human trafficking, labor exploitation, sexual economies, child abuse, immigration, intersecting forms of violence and poly-victimization, trauma, culture, legal systems, media representations, prevention, and a range of modalities to respond to trafficking and violence from micro to macro contexts.

As students learned about human trafficking, discussed with each other the content, watched videos, and read content, through their regular engagement with course content, it was an honor to be part of their journey in shifting in understanding and knowledge on complex issues. Even as we connected on the web, students connected to each other through their words, and for some, eventually, through image and sound.

This web publication of student created content is dedicated to remembering those who survived, lived through, continue to survive, passed on, and are dying from forms of violence such as human trafficking.

Students in the online course created a range of content – video, podcasts, scholarly writing, addressing issues regarding a twenty-first century concern: human trafficking. The content created by students do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Dr. Fukushima.

About the professor: Dr. Annie Isabel Fukushima is an Assistant Professor in the Ethnic Studies division at University of Utah. Dr. Fukushima is author of the book Migrant Crossings: Witnessing Human Trafficking in the US (Stanford University Press, 2019). She has authored multiple scholarly and public works on issues of violence, race, gender, and immigration. And has served as an expert witness on human trafficking for a range of courts in California, Colorado, Utah, and Washington.

Videos

Podcasts

Scholarly Papers

Select few scholarly papers written by graduate students at University of Utah. Do not recirculate, reproduce, or cite without the author’s expressed permission.

“Pedagogies of the Zombie”

https://convention2.allacademic.com/one/theasa/theasa17/index.php?cmd=Online+Program+View+Paper&selected_paper_id=1260218&PHPSESSID=l21jg6scm9iim2j90r7ik4dhi3
In Event: International Committee Talkshop II: Pedagogies of Dissent in A Global Context

Fri, November 10, 2:00 to 3:45pm, Hyatt Regency Chicago, Horner, Third Floor West Tower
Abstract
The image of the zombie as a figure is iconic. The zombie is Frankenstein’s monster, the figure through which Mary Shelley transgressed women’s roles in the 1800s by writing about it. In the 1970s, the zombie figure was articulated through imagery of the wives of Stepford – she was zombie-like submissive woman. Today it has multiple meanings from the person controlled through voodoo rituals, to the brain eating human chasing monster, to the warm heart zombie that falls in-love and becomes human again. The zombie is a resurrected figure through which alterities are reinforced, imagined, and disrupted. It raises ontological questions regarding who and what counts for as the human. The living dead are also social and historical figures that rise up, haunt and stalk the living. The living dead encompass when a history of colonization, genocide, death, slavery, an American apartheid furthered by racism, sexism, and classism, and transnational migration and diasporic subjectivities, are reanimated for the living as the living dead. At times the living dead makes visible ghostly matters. Zombies are not just about the danger – they represent societal concerns, anxieties, and hopes for another kind of future. In neoliberal modern colonial economic systems, are zombies a mechanism of survivance? They raise questions regarding the haunting – sociological, imaginary, and historical – creating a scene of witnessing. Through the living recuperation, recovery, reclamations, appeals to witnessing are made possible. Dr. Fukushima and Dr. Pillow offer reflections and a framework, through a course they team taught at University of Utah – Zombie Futurities. In analyzing the course curriculum, the context in which we were teaching, and the narratives of social death and zombification circulating in politics and media, we put forth a pedagogies of the zombie. A pedagogies of the zombie is methodology of teaching that centralizes decolonial feminisms, anti-racist theory, and gender, to understand how subjects and practices create social death, the living, dead, and hauntings, that may be contended with in the classroom.

Authors
Annie Isabel Fukushima, University of Utah
Wanda Pillow, University of Utah